Tag: Resistance

Dispatches from the Struggle with Mark k. Tilsen: Standing Rock, L’eau est La Vie Camp, Water Protectors, Indigenous Rights, Sovereignty, and Political Prisoners

Register via Zoom here

Mark k. Tilsen: Indigenous Rights & Sovereignty, Standing Rock, L’eau est La Vie Camp, & Indigenous Political Prisoners

Rescheduled – March 31st, 2022, at 6:00 p.m. EST

Join Dispatches from the Struggle in welcoming Mark k. Tilsen, Oglala Lakota Poet Educator from the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Mark will join us to discuss Indigenous Rights & Sovereignty, Standing Rock, L’eau est La Vie Camp, & Indigenous Political Prisoners, with moderator Jamila Hammami, Co-Organizer of External and Labor Relations at the Adjunct Project

Mark k. Tilsen is an Oglala Lakota Poet Educator from the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. He comes from activist families long steeped in the struggle for liberation for all people and the long-term survival of the Lakota Nation. At Standing Rock, he stepped into the role of a direct action trainer and police liaison. Since then he has led training and teach-ins about the lessons learned from Standing Rock.

Mark spent months at the L’eau est La Vie Camp helping fight against the Bayou Bridge Pipeline which is the tail end of the Dakota Access Pipeline ending in Louisiana. His first book of poetry, It Ain’t Over Until We’re Smoking Cigars on the Drill Pad: Poems from Standing Rock and the frontlines recalls the struggle against the pipeline through a blend of journal entries and poems.

Buy your copy of It Ain’t Over Until We’re Smoking Cigars on the Drill Pad: Poems from Standing Rock and the frontlines on Mark’s website, Patreon, or Venmo.

Learn more: Mark k. Tilsen’s website, Instagram, & Twitter.

Dispatches from the Struggle is a series that focuses on intersectional community organizing and social movement struggles outside of CUNY that intersect with CUNY struggles. The Dispatches from the Struggle series was created to benefit CUNY adjuncts, graduate workers, and students through political education on critical issues that impact the CUNY community. Dispatches from the Struggle seeks to connect struggles and build solidarity and power across movements and is free and open to CUNY and the global community.

Questions? Contact CUNY Adjunct Project’s Co-Organizer of External & Labor Relations, Jamila Hammami at adjunctproject[@]protonmail.com

Dispatches from the Struggle with Respond Crisis Translation: Fighting for Afghan Solidarity and Language Justice at the Intersection of Fair Wages & Economic Justice

Register via Zoom here

Dispatches from the Struggle with Respond Crisis Translation: Fighting for Afghan Solidarity and Language Justice at the Intersection of Fair Wages & Economic Justice

Join Dispatches from the Struggle in welcoming Marie-Ève Monette and Uma of Respond Crisis Translation. The panel will focus on Respond Crisis Translation’s fight for Afghan Solidarity and Language Justice at the Intersection of Fair Wages/ Economic Justice, with moderator Jamila Hammami, Co-Organizer of External and Labor Relations at the Adjunct Project.

  • Date & Time: Monday, March 14th, 2002, at 12:00 p.m. EST
  • Location: Zoom

The Dispatches from the Struggle panel, Respond Crisis Translation: Fighting for Afghan Solidarity and Language Justice at the Intersection of Fair Wages/Economic Justice, will discuss the tireless efforts of Respond Crisis Translation, their current work with Afghan Refugees, and the fight for dignified and fair wages among the Afghan Dari and Pashto-speaking community.

Since August 2021, 77,000 Afghans have arrived in the U.S. Now that they are resettling into communities around the country, they have only one year to apply for asylum, and are already doing so in the thousands. Meanwhile, Afghans still living in Afghanistan are facing employment shortages, which is leading to difficult access to food and medicine. Conditions under the Taliban are increasingly dangerous, especially for interpreters and translators.

Drought, conflict, COVID-19 and a collapsing economy have left more than half the people in Afghanistan facing a record level of acute hunger, according to a recent UN report. The team is currently supporting over 5,000 Afghan people, a number which will increase in coming months as more organizations continue to reach out.

Respond is a collective of over 2,500 global language activists providing compassionate, effective and trauma-informed interpretation and translation services for migrants, refugees, and anyone experiencing language barriers, while ensuring fair wages to systems-impacted language practitioners.

Learn more about our Respond Crisis Translation panelists, Marie-Ève Monette and Uma:

Uma is the Afghan Languages Team Lead at Respond Crisis Translation, and also a multilingual person committed to fighting against language barriers. Uma is an Afghan Dari and Pashto interpreter and translator who is on the ground supporting Afghan refugees. She has over 15 years of experience working alongside Afghan, Iranian, and Pakistani refugees and/or other migrants, and over 10 years of experience as an interpreter and translator in Pakistan. Uma speaks Dari, Pashto, Urdu, Persian, English, and Norwegian.

Marie-Ève Monette is the Director of Development at Respond Crisis Translation, and a multilingual person committed to advocate for language access, democracy and justice, as well as immigrant rights. Marie-Ève has worked to amplify the voices of non-English speakers for almost 15 years, through teaching, filmmaking, fundraising, and also as a translator and interpreter. She speaks French, Spanish, and English.

Learn more: Respond Crisis Translation’s website, Twitter, and Instagram

Due to safety concerns, the Dispatches from the Struggle panel, Respond Crisis Translation: Fighting for Language Justice at the Intersection of Fair Wages/Economic Justice, will not be recorded.

The Zoom Webinar link will be emailed to registrants the morning of the event.

The Adjunct Project is currently working in solidarity with Respond Crisis Translation’s critical and life-saving global campaign of Afghans as they apply for asylum. The Adjunct Project is working to ensure that we are able to support their mission to provide dignified and fair wages to systems-impacted Afghan Dari and Pashto interpreters and translators living in Afghanistan, and those abroad supporting families still in Afghanistan.

Dispatches from the Struggle is a series that focuses on intersectional community organizing and social movement struggles outside of CUNY that intersect with CUNY struggles. The Dispatches from the Struggle series was created to benefit CUNY adjuncts, graduate workers, and students through political education on critical issues that impact the CUNY community. Dispatches from the Struggle seeks to connect struggles and build solidarity and power across movements and is free and open to CUNY and the global community.

Questions? Contact CUNY Adjunct Project’s Co-Organizer of External & Labor Relations, Jamila Hammami at adjunctproject[@]protonmail.com

Call for Papers: The New Youth Movements

Call For Papers: American Anthropological Association

Annual Conference: Chicago, Illinois – November 20th – 24th, 2013

 

Panel Title:

The New “Youth Movements”: Political Subjectivity, Crisis, and Resistance

 

Panel Organizers:

Manissa McCleave Maharawal (mmaharawal@gc.cuny.edu), CUNY Graduate Center

Zoltán Glück, (zgluck@gc.cuny.edu), CUNY Graduate Center

 

In late October, 2011 Egyptian activists wrote a solidarity letter to Occupy Wall Street in which they stated: “an entire generation across the globe has grown up realizing, rationally and emotionally, that we have no future in the current order of things,” (Guardian 2011). Identifying a commonality in their struggles, the letter expresses a blunt urgency; that their generation is going to have to create “what we can no longer wait for” (ibid). This urgency was also seemingly felt by thousands around the world as youth-led movements over the past two years have toppled governments from Tunis to Montreal. Within these movements, and in their wake, new forms of political practices, political identities, and solidarities have emerged and begun to change the way that young people facing dire social and economic challenges understand their lived reality. Youth worldwide continue to be hit the hardest by the global economic turbulence and job crises (UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs, 2012) and are slated for continued economic struggles. However, as shown by their overwhelming participation in various political struggles around the globe, youth are challenging these conditions in a myriad of complex and organized ways.

This panel seeks to explore the connections and differences across and between these places and modes of resistance. We aim to foster dialogue between movements and in doing so to break down categories and boundaries of anthropologist/activist and researcher/participant in these contemporary movements. We are interested in exploring and theorizing emergent modalities of resistance, political subjectivities, and organizational forms within contemporary youth politics. In doing so we are putting forward the concept of “youth movements” as a plausible framework within which to analyze the current groundswell of youth-led political events.

Papers topics may include:

  • Contemporary youth movements and the crisis of neoliberalism
  • Student movements and the crisis of the university
  • Youth as a political category
  • Political subjectivity and processes of radicalization
  • The historical role of youth in social change
  • The contemporary roles of youth in social movements
  • Global uprisings as “youth movements”
  • Political economy of student movements
  • Strategies, tactics and political practices of youth resistance
  • Decision-making and organizational structures of movements
  • The role of affect within youth movements
  • Contemporary forms of radical youth politics
  • Dynamics of race, class and gender within student movements
  • Politics and practices of accountability and self-governance (or “autogestion”)
  • Movement cultures, youth subcultures, and practices of resistance
  • Uses of space/production of space/place-making practices in contemporary movements
  • Papers grappling with methodological, ethical, and political issues of scholar-activism, engaged anthropology, “protest anthropology” and activist ethnography

If you are interested in participating please send a paper abstract of no more than 250 words to mmaharawal@gc.cuny.edu or zgluck@gc.cuny.edu by April 7th, 2013.

 

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